PennApps 2012 Sells Out Faster Than Justin Bieber’s North American Tour

At 11:25 last night, the PennApps team sent an email to everyone on their mailing list. “Registration is now open!” they said. PennApps is the largest student-run hackathon in the country, so they expected some interest. But they didn’t anticipate what happened next. By midnight, all 100 of the “visiting hacker” tickets were gone. There were still some tickets available for Penn students, but all of the open tickets had been sold already. (In case …

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App.net: The Country Club of the Internet?

Let’s imagine, for a minute, a world in which App.net is successful. App.net is filled with people who understand the value of buying a product to preserve their privacy. “Members” pay $50 a year to enjoy a platform where they, not advertisers, are in control of their data. These are the people who are startup-literate, technically competent and probably well educated. Meanwhile, everyone else is on, let’s say, Facebook. Initially, I’m reminded of the split …

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How to Get a Kickass Internship as a High School Student

I was an intern at Valve the summer after my senior year. Another one of my friends worked at NASA. Others worked for Microsoft, Bank of America, or interesting startups. Others threw their hands up in the air because “no one wants a high school intern.” Once you’re in college, the road to an internship is straightforward. Often, a recruiter comes to your school, you give him or her your resume, and then later they …

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Valve Sombrero Hour

Valve Sombrero Hour

I’m working on a post that I think people will find valuable. In the meantime, here’s a year-old picture of me in a sombrero, for Valve’s Sombrero Hour.

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The 8 Kinds of Projects You Meet at a Hackathon

The 8 Kinds of Projects You Meet at a Hackathon

I went to my sixth hackathon this weekend, and by now I’ve met all 8 kinds. First, a quick note about that hackathon: Facebook’s Summer of Hack in Seattle was a blast. There were plenty of things that set it apart from the other hackathons I’ve been to–the relatively relaxed atmosphere and the amazing view were a good start. But there were also some characteristic hackathon hallmarks I noticed–the energy drinks, the midnight raffles, and …

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The Problem with Daniel Tosh

If you don’t know who Daniel Tosh is, you’re lucky. He’s a “comedian” who makes jokes that are primarily misogynistic, racist or otherwise offensive. He’s been in the news recently after he remarked recently that it would be funny if one of his (female) audience members was raped by “like, five guys right now.” There was the appropriate Twitter kerfuffle and minor media storm. “Let’s end his career!” everyone cheers, tired of the crap we’ve …

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A Weekend in San Francisco – Pack Check

Like many other Seattle area tech interns, I have a lot of friends working in the Bay Area. (“Our entire computer science department relocated to San Francisco!” bemoaned one of my coworkers, who goes to school in Rhode Island.) So I decided to drive down to see those friends, over the course of a weekend. It was a long drive for a short trip, but altogether it was completely worth it. A quick pack-check for those …

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On Technical Entitlement

On Technical Entitlement

By most measures, I should have technical entitlement in spades. I’m the granddaughter of a software engineer and the daughter of a entrepreneur. I could use a computer just about as soon as I could sit up. When I was 11, I made my first website and within a year I was selling code. I took six semesters of computer science in high school, and I had two internships behind me when I started my …

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Microsoft, the creepy old man? Hardly.

Microsoft, the creepy old man? Hardly.

Microsoft is basically a creepy old man, and the interns are all brainwashed and deluded. Or so one might think after reading an article that Reuters published earlier this week. The headline reads, “Aging Microsoft Lures Young Tech Idealists,” and that says it all. (It certainly evokes an image of a creepy, predatory old man.) While Microsoft is considered “irrelevant, bureaucratic and dull,” the interns bubble with unbridled enthusiasm and students have ranked it #2 …

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Iron Blogger – Seattle

Iron Blogger – Seattle

On a whim, Drew and I decided to start an Iron Blogger group in Seattle. You’re invited. What does that mean? Well, the premise is pretty simple. Everyone in the group commits themselves to writing a post each week. If you don’t write your post, you owe $5 into the pot. When the pot fills up, everyone goes out and has a beer–or the non-alcoholic drink of their choice. Personally I like lemonade. And then …

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