6 articles Articles posted in Popular

The Most Important Part of Your Hackathon? Your Sponsors.

The Most Important Part of Your Hackathon? Your Sponsors.

I sort of hate to say it: it’s not your food, it’s not your numbers, it’s not that awesome photo booth you ordered or that 3 AM snowball fight you organized. The most important part of your hackathon is probably your sponsors. And not just how much they’re paying—although that matters, too—but who’s paying. Who are you inviting to your hackathon? Who’s getting access to your mailing list? Remember: You are selling me. I am your product. As the …

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On Interning at Valve

On Interning at Valve

How I got my internship People often say that success happens when preparation meets luck. It’s trite, but in my case it was true.

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App.net: The Country Club of the Internet?

Let’s imagine, for a minute, a world in which App.net is successful. App.net is filled with people who understand the value of buying a product to preserve their privacy. “Members” pay $50 a year to enjoy a platform where they, not advertisers, are in control of their data. These are the people who are startup-literate, technically competent and probably well educated. Meanwhile, everyone else is on, let’s say, Facebook. Initially, I’m reminded of the split …

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On Technical Entitlement

On Technical Entitlement

By most measures, I should have technical entitlement in spades. I’m the granddaughter of a software engineer and the daughter of a entrepreneur. I could use a computer just about as soon as I could sit up. When I was 11, I made my first website and within a year I was selling code. I took six semesters of computer science in high school, and I had two internships behind me when I started my …

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Microsoft, the creepy old man? Hardly.

Microsoft, the creepy old man? Hardly.

Microsoft is basically a creepy old man, and the interns are all brainwashed and deluded. Or so one might think after reading an article that Reuters published earlier this week. The headline reads, “Aging Microsoft Lures Young Tech Idealists,” and that says it all. (It certainly evokes an image of a creepy, predatory old man.) While Microsoft is considered “irrelevant, bureaucratic and dull,” the interns bubble with unbridled enthusiasm and students have ranked it #2 …

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Notes from Penn’s Open Forum on Brogramming (and Sexism in Computer Science)

Notes from Penn’s Open Forum on Brogramming (and Sexism in Computer Science)

Two of Penn’s Computer Science groups hosted an open forum on brogramming last night. Yes, you read me right. Brogramming. Or that awkward mashup-man of programmer and frat bro. We had an entire forum on brogramming–and, by extension, sexism in computer science. (About two dozen people showed up.) This all started when Penn’s general computer science student group considered making “Brogrammer” shirts for a bacchanal Penn tradition. When this was proposed, there was some resistance which …

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